Words of the Week: N


Hello again, folks! Welcome to another episode of Words for the Week, which happens every Sunday. I have so many books full of great words, and I so rarely have an excuse to delve into them. So I’m putting together a small selection of these lovely words once a week, in the hope that you enjoy them as much as I do. This week’s words begin with ‘N’. 

Newel (noun): 1. The central post of a flight of stairs that supports winding stairs; 2. The top of bottom post supporting a stair-rail. Derived from Old French nouel ‘knob’ from Latin nodellus, diminutive of nodus, ‘knot’.

You know how much I love obscure technical words for things. Mental note to use this in a book – I’m really enjoying its specificness. 

Noctivagous (adjective): Wandering in the night. Derived from Latin nox ‘night’ and vagari ‘to wander’.

I wonder if there’s a verb version of this? I’d love to stick it into a piece of writing, but the adjective form feels a bit smug to me. Anyway, night words always sound great. 

Numinous (adjective): 1. Awe-inspiring; evoking a spiritual response; 2. Inducing a sense of a deity’s presence.

Somehow, I had always assumed that this was a night word too – maybe because of its closeness to ‘luminous’. I’m having trouble now mentally connecting it to its real meaning. The closest I can get is night-worship. 

Nazzard (noun): Cumberland, Lancashire, Westmorland, Yorkshire. A silly, insignificant, mean person. 

“As with other nouns beginning with ‘n-‘ or ‘a-‘, people often couldn’t decide where to draw the line between the indefinite article and the noun: is it a nazzard or an azzard?” Another example of this is ‘apple’ – originally ‘napple’ until spelling was standardised and the ‘n’ at the end of ‘an’ moved across the space. It’s a cool language thing, and a cool word.

Noof (adjective): Scotland. Sheltered from the weather, snug; neat, trim. The later-developed verb form, noofan, means ‘to enjoy oneself leisurely’. Etymology unknown. Could simply be a word that developed out of a noise – in this case, a sound expressing satisfaction.

Sound words are also my faves. It’s that sound you make when you sit down in your favourite chair at the end of the day with a beverage and a book. Why did we ever adopt hygge? We already have a word of our own – well, Scotland does, anyway. 

This week’s words were sourced from Foyle’s Philavery, collected by Christopher Foyle; The Disappearing Dictionary by David Crystal.

100th post! Meet the Blogger

Hello, folks! I’ve been running this blog for just over a year now, and today is my 100th post!

I initially started with the intention of cataloguing my reading for and experiences at YALC 2016. I enjoyed connecting with other readers and writers, but since I’d started blogs before and never managed to stick with them, I wasn’t making any big commitment to a long term project.

But YALC was fun, and I was going to a couple of other book events over the summer, so I thought I’d stick with it for now at least, have some fun, and see where I got.

It wasn’t until the beginning of this year that I realised I wanted to make a proper go of it. I started scheduling posts in advance, interacting more with the online book community, and committed myself to several year-long reading challenges to pull me through any potential slumps.

And now, here we are. 100 posts in, over a year blogging, and I’ve met so many great people, and read so many amazing books. So I thought it would be nice to do a meet-the-blogger post to celebrate my milestone. Thus: here are some things about me! Continue reading

Review: The Curse of the Gloamglozer by Paul Stewart & Chris Riddell


Goodreads summary:
Fourteen-year-old Quint Verginix is the only remaining son of famous sky-pirate Wind Jackal. He and his father have journeyed to the city of Sanctaphrax – a great floating rock, bound to the ground below by a chain, its inhabitants living with their heads literally in the clouds.

But the city hides a dangerous secret: deep inside the great rock, something horrible lurks. With his father away, Quint may be the only one who can save Sanctaphrax from the dreaded curse of the gloamglozer . . .

The Curse of the Gloamglozer is the first book of the Quint Saga – first trilogy in The Edge Chronicles, the internationally best-selling fantasy series, which has featured on the UK and the New York Times best-seller lists and sold more than 3 million copies. There are now 13 titles and four trilogies in the series, but each book is a stand-alone adventure, so you can read The Edge Chronicles in any order you choose. Continue reading

Words of the Week: M


Hello again, folks! Welcome to another episode of Words for the Week, which happens every Sunday. I have so many books full of great words, and I so rarely have an excuse to delve into them. So I’m putting together a small selection of these lovely words once a week, in the hope that you enjoy them as much as I do. This week’s words begin with ‘M’. Continue reading

Review: Binti by Nnedi Okorafor


Goodreads summary:

Her name is Binti, and she is the first of the Himba people ever to be offered a place at Oomza University, the finest institution of higher learning in the galaxy. But to accept the offer will mean giving up her place in her family to travel between the stars among strangers who do not share her ways or respect her customs.

Knowledge comes at a cost, one that Binti is willing to pay, but her journey will not be easy. The world she seeks to enter has long warred with the Meduse, an alien race that has become the stuff of nightmares. Oomza University has wronged the Meduse, and Binti’s stellar travel will bring her within their deadly reach.

If Binti hopes to survive the legacy of a war not of her making, she will need both the gifts of her people and the wisdom enshrined within the University, itself – but first she has to make it there, alive. Continue reading

Review: Knit One Girl Two by Shira Glassman 


Goodreads summary:

Small-batch independent yarn dyer Clara Ziegler is eager to brainstorm new color combinations–if only she could come up with ideas she likes as much as last time! When she sees Danielle Solomon’s paintings of Florida wildlife by chance at a neighborhood gallery, she finds her source of inspiration. Outspoken, passionate, and complicated, Danielle herself soon proves even more captivating than her artwork…

Fluffy Jewish f/f contemporary set in the author’s childhood home of South Florida. Continue reading

Words for the Week: K


Hello again, folks! Welcome to another episode of Words for the Week, which happens every Sunday. I have so many books full of great words, and I so rarely have an excuse to delve into them. So I’m putting together a small selection of these lovely words once a week, in the hope that you enjoy them as much as I do. This week’s words begin with ‘K’.  Continue reading

Review: Allaha of the Mountain by Aurora Thornton (Wildflowers #1)


Goodreads summary:

Allaha is a knight of the Order of Aisha, Fallen of the Mountain. She – like her fellows – is stoic and reserved, trained to fight against demons and their ilk. When she triggers a vision that kills a renown oracle, she is set on a quest to complete the prophecy.

She becomes the protector of those mentioned in the prophecy.

Tamara is a young woman of the Menori – a migrant people that travel in caravans. She is also a hamalakh, able to sense the emotions of others as well as sense falsehoods. She is sometimes wise beyond her years, but at other times her youth can cause her to draw incorrect conclusions.

Hibu, a sorcerer, is from the country of Jeongwon – a land where the nobility are worshipped as gods. He was the personal sorcerer of Prince Ji – a testament to the strength of his powers. He is ever curious and seeking new knowledge, questioning all the people they meet on their journey. He is joined by his demon familiar, Goric.

Karejakal was orphaned by the death of his entire clan – but his mastak powers gave him the ability to keep their spirits close. Still a child, Karej is a Tibu – a race of cat people that walk upright. Learning of his people from the spirits of his clan, the child has adopted Allaha as his mother.

Together, they travel the land of Magdra, seeking answers to a broken prophecy wherein they only know two things – that a darkness is coming, and that they are meant to stop it. All they need to discover now is how to do it. Continue reading